SIGHT SPECIFIC

Curatorial Art Practice in London

ROBYN DENNY exhibition catalogue

The catalogue for ROBYN DENNY solo exhibition is now available to purchase at the following link: ROBYN DENNY catalogue.

The publication includes reproductions and details of all the exhibited works, with additional archive images from the 1960s; key themes and turning points of Denny’s art practice are drawn out in both John Bunker’s essay and Laurent Delaye’s foreword.

John Bunker (Abstract Critical) at 'Robyn Denny' private view, Laurent Delaye Gallery, 2013. Installation view:  'Concentration 5', 1959, and 'Connections', 1964-1965. Photo by Kiti Swannell.

John Bunker (Abstract Critical) looking at Robyn Denny’s ‘Concentration 5’, 1959, and ‘Connections’, 1964-1965. Installation shot. Photo by Kiti Swannell.

In the foreword, Laurent Delaye writes: “There is a quality in the work of Denny that is unmatched by most of the other British abstract artists of his generation; his Hard-Edge vocational choice in 1960 took him a step ahead. The intricate relationship of scale, colour and medium, and the painstakingly complex compositions of layers towards a unique emanation of tone, all contributed to a radical new syntactic structure and order within itself. The work does not seek to lure the viewer in; it is powerfully straightforward, an open field of forms and colours to the naked eye. Its powerful materiality, however, goes well beyond its apparent corporeality, slowly releasing subliminal perception. This substantial element, which is technical – the painting is an object – is also about Time, experienced, enhanced, and relived. The work absorbs us into a new experience of looking, with absolute simplicity and considerable precision, in which the human scale is the ultimate key, as well as the integration of the subject in the object, in a complete statement of intent.”

Robyn Denny, 'Go Between', 1965-1966, oil on canvas, 243.8 x 198 cm. Photo by Matthew Hollow

Robyn Denny, ‘Go Between’, 1965-1966, oil on canvas, 243.8 x 198 cm. Photo by Matthew Hollow

According to John Bunker, “[…] in works like Go Between and Connections, 1964-1965, Denny seems to intensify or heighten our awareness of the complex circuitry of perception, re-sensitising us to a visual pulse endlessly adjusting and reconnecting the eye to the mind and the body. This is something special to abstract art. He is stretching out or slowing down the way we see, placing our perceptual apparatus in a constantly evolving liminal realm achieved through the play of painting’s most basic attributes.”

Go Between is one of Robyn Denny’s seminal paintings of the 1960s, and has been shown in several landmarks exhibitions during the last decades, including the XXXIII Venice Biennale 1966; The British Council: Young British Painters, at Brussels ‘67; Robyn Denny, retrospective exhibition, at the Tate Gallery, London, 7 March – 23 April 1973, touring to Wurttengergischer Kunstverein, Stuttgart, and Stadtisches Museum, Leverkusen (Germany). For more information on the artist, please see Robyn Denny artist page.

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This entry was posted on 24 October 2013 by in Exhibitions, Robyn Denny and tagged , , , , , .

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© Laurent Delaye Gallery, 2012. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Laurent Delaye Gallery with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.
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