SIGHT SPECIFIC

Curatorial Art Practice in London

Opening night MYTHOLOGICAL PROPORTION

Mythological Proportion is a take on the allegory of magnitude, the fabrication of meaning, and the imaginary narrative created out of the void. The exhibition includes works by Jack Brindley, Peter Lamb and Stefan Ruitenbeek and opened on Thursday 28th November 2013 at the Laurent Delaye Gallery.

Jack Brindley, 'Ratholes in the Babylon of information', 2013. Installation view, Laurent Delaye Gallery. Photo by Kiti Swannell.

Jack Brindley, ‘Ratholes in the Babylon of information’, 2013. Installation view, Laurent Delaye Gallery. Photo by Kiti Swannell.

Peter Lamb, Golden Army, 2013. Installation view, Laurent Delaye Gallery

Peter Lamb, Golden Army, 2013. Installation view, Laurent Delaye Gallery. Photo by Kiti Swannell.

The three artists in this exhibition have taken on the challenge to experiment with the promiscuity of one space to parallel their own different practices. In twisting perception by reversing scale and playing with inverted mediums in order to blow the myth of representation, they all have a special interest in teasing the familiar and the hierarchy of systems.

Peter Lamb, Blue Dolphin Yellow Sunrise, 2013. Photo by Kiti Swannell.

PETER LAMB 'Blue dolphin yellow sunrise' 2013 digital print of studio floor on softimage 240, acrylic and powder paint, 100x80cm

Peter Lamb, 'Golden Army', 2013 and Jack Brindley, 'We shape our tools' and 'Ratholes in the Babylon f information', 2013. Installation view, Laurent Delaye Gallery

Peter Lamb, ‘Golden Army’, 2013 and Jack Brindley, ‘We shape our tools’ and ‘Ratholes in the Babylon f information’, 2013. Installation view, Laurent Delaye Gallery. Photo by Kiti Swannell.

Laurent Delaye and Peter Lamb during the private view night.

Laurent Delaye and Peter Lamb. Photo by Kiti Swannell.

Peter Lamb is a painter interested in the magnification of scale and in the pictorialisation of the real world, when inserted into the language of informal abstraction. He experiments with how things look when they are taken out of their own given physical context, and enter a new identity of forms. Hence, the cosmos that is so vast looks like a postcard to our mind. He uses as an initial support random photographed extracts of his studio floor, as a platform made of unintentional markings. The floor is the reject, the waste material, that questions the idea of painting, its status and its authority; his tool, a repeated collapsing process of scaling up photographs, painting over, rescaling and repainting. In Lamb’s work, the image is loaded with attributes that confound proportions and allow the artist to play havoc with the dynamics of abstraction.

Jack Brindley, Designing Out (On&On) 2, 2013. Installation view, Laurent Delaye Gallery

Jack Brindley, Designing Out (On&On) 2, 2013. Installation view, Laurent Delaye Gallery. Photo by Kiti Swannell.

Jack Brindley, 'Designing Out (On&On) 2' and 'We shape our tools', 2013. Installation shot, Laurent Delaye Gallery.

Jack Brindley, ‘Designing Out (On&On) 2’ and ‘We shape our tools’, 2013. Installation view, Laurent Delaye Gallery. Photo by Kiti Swannell.

Andrea Medjesi-Jones and Clare Bradley during the private view night. In the background, Jack Brindley's work.

Andrea Medjesi-Jones (left)  In the background, Jack Brindley’s work. Photo by Kiti Swannell.

Jack Brindley makes works from a diverse range of mediums; often drawing from conditions that exist in the world he manipulates materials and re-purposes ‘found’ material gestures into artworks. He is an experimenter of the reactions of mediums against each other, applying diversifications and dual purposes. His work is concerned with how temporal, spatial and economic practices have shifted throughout history and as a result how ideas and objects exist in the world. As every thing can be traced back to the set of ‘conditions’ that produced it, Brindley’s work is engaged in exploring how expectations and encounters with objects can be manipulated. Concerned with the relationship art has with its environment, his work reflects on the way we think about, navigate and operate within space. The diversity that his tools bring to this exhibition include a work on aluminium, coated with his own brand of ink and its attempted removal, a printed rug, and collected rejects from the Savile Row tailors.

Jack Brindley (left), Laurent Delaye (centre) and Stefan Ruitenbeek (right). In the background, Peter Lamb's work 'Golden Army'.

Jack Brindley (left), Laurent Delaye (centre) and Stefan Ruitenbeek (right). In the background, Peter Lamb’s work ‘Golden Army’.

Stefan Ruitenbeek. set of six photographic prints, 2013. Installation view, Laurent Delaye Gallery.

Stefan Ruitenbeek, set of six photographic prints, 2013. Installation view, Laurent Delaye Gallery. Photo by Kiti Swannell.

Stefan Ruitenbeek equally works his way from chaos to order. In classical epic painting, the defining factor is the composition made of abstract principles, rather than the story depicted. The cognitive experience is led by visual rhythmic structures, no matter what the story tells. In this staging of depth and shadows, light, lines, pleats and flesh arguably resides the near totality of art. Ruitenbeek seeks a similar metamorphosis with his photographs of live compositions. He believes that pictures come from nothing, as expressed by the chaos of his studio, which serves as a prop to his naked models posing in extreme situations. With their flesh deconstructed by generous amount of fresh paint, these figures emerge through smoke and lighting, pieces of smeared clothing and disparate pieces of wood serving as plinths for nudes, in a scenery of devastation, that become a perfectly ordered epic in itself. The random associations that emerge almost accidentally with the great masters and their enduring images, allude to the arbitrariness of all references and their persistent availability for appropriation.

Eleonora Raspi and Andrea Medjesi-Jones in front of Stefan Ruitenbeek's photographic prints

Eleonora Raspi (centre) and Andrea Medjesi-Jones (right). In the background. Stefan Ruitenbeek’s six photographic prints. Photo by Kiti Swannell.

Stefan Ruitenbeek at the private view night. Peter Lamb's work 'Golden Army', 2013.

Stefan Ruitenbeek (centre). In the background, Peter Lamb’s work ‘Golden Army’, 2013. Photo by Kiti Swannell.

Photographer Kiti Swannel. In the background Stefan Ruitenbeek's photographic prints

Photographer Kiti Swannel. In the background, Stefan Ruitenbeek’s six photographic prints.

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Fun and stimulating review on Jason Oddy and revolution from Sight Warde-Aldam''s bedroom and beyond

http://www.apollo-magazine.com/london-needs-a-spring-clean-or-perhaps-a-period-of-stagnation/?utm_content=buffer4899e&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_campaign=buffer  #art #architecture  #jasonoddy #oscarniemeyer  #BrazilEmbassyUK  #coyalondon_  #sitespecific  #photography  #contemporaryart  #london  #algeria  #Mucem  #contemporaryphotography  #photographylondon  #currentshow  #laurentdelaye Jason Oddy on Oscar Niemeyer, Communism, Algeria and Revolution
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@BrazilEmbassyUK  @coyalondon_  @laurentdelaye. #art #architecture  #jasonoddy #oscarniemeyer  #BrazilEmbassyUK  #coyalondon_  #sitespecific  #photography  #contemporaryart  #london  #algeria  #Mucem  #contemporaryphotography  #photographylondon  #currentshow  #laurentdelaye Jason Oddy on Oscar Niemeyer, Communism, Algeria and Revolution

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@BrazilEmbassyUK  @coyalondon_  @laurentdelaye. #art #architecture  #jasonoddy #oscarniemeyer  #BrazilEmbassyUK  #coyalondon_  #sitespecific  #photography  #contemporaryart  #london  #algeria  #Mucem  #contemporaryphotography  #photographylondon  #currentshow  #laurentdelaye Jason Oddy on communism, Oscar Niemeyer and Revolution. Coming on 14 April at the Embassy of Brazil in London
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